Which Hogwarts House Does Your Company Belong In?

In the spirit of Fantastic Beasts taking the theatres by storm (okay, maybe I’ve seen it three times), Smart Savvy thought to take a deeper dive into the world of Harry Potter (okay, maybe it was only my idea) through a corporate lens, of course. All four Hogwarts houses have very specific traits, characteristics, and colours that identify their people — much like the identifying corporate culture of each workplace (only minus the wearing of colours…and having a Quidditch team). Each House is uniquely distinct and attracts different personalities. Gryffindors are lions: brave and courageous, daring to do things others would shy away from (like facing Voldemort, for example). Hufflepuffs are as gentle as they sound — they’re kind, trustworthy, and just (not to mention they’ve produced the least amount of dark wizards out of all the houses #peacekeepers). Ravenclaws are sharp like their name, a house of intelligence, wit, and wisdom. Lastly, Slytherin has a bad rap but actually possesses admirable qualities such as determination, charm, and ambition.  Where Other Companies Were Sorted… So at this point all JK Rowling fanatics are thinking, where does my company and culture fit? Where would the sorting hat send me and my colleagues? Luckily for you, our friends over at Venngage created a sorting quiz — think Pottermore, but for businesses — and even sorted companies based on that company’s response or their Glassdoor/culture reviews. If you’ve ever doubted that Slytherin is the evil house, think again: Tech Company Culture Hogwarts Houses | Make an Infographic And Smart Savvy is… After much humming and hawing (how does that sorting hat do it?) and wanting to answer with TWO answers for most questions, Smart Savvy landed in the Ravenclaw crew. That’s right, we’re witty and we know it....

The Recruiting Strategies Of The Voice Coaches

The Voice is viewed by millions of fans every season with the blinds being, undeniably, the most exciting part of each season. What do the coaches listen for? What do those tune-perfect ears hear that mine don’t?  But more than that is the vulnerability each coach shows in deciding to be on the show. What if nobody picks your team? What if only three people want to be coached by you? In steps the recruitment strategy of The Voice, where each coach has to win people over in their own individual way. Should you be pushy? Should you let people come to you? Should you get Dolly Parton to appear in video for you? Here are the recruitment processes we’ve witnessed from each coach: Adam Developer. Cultivator. Focus. He’s got the skinnies, the falsetto, the tattoos. He’s got the swagger and he’s got the strategy. Team Adam is team focus: he’s looking for x,y,z and he will make it very known when and if you fit into the overall vision of his team. He zeroes in on exactly what he wants and he doesn’t hit his button just because someone else has (cough, Miley, cough). He thinks potential-first and begins the coaching phase right from the blinds. He’s a natural teacher, a developer, and he knows you have sh*t to learn (especially from him). [WPGP gif_id=”6078″ width=”600″] Miley Relator. Individualizer. #YouGotThis. This comes as a surprise to no one –the coach wearing pasted pink flowers to her denim jacket is most certainly team express yourself. Her recruitment on The Voice involves making everyone feel individual, special, and mining out the “what makes you you?” emotion. (Dare we say she’s Dr. Seuss re-incarnate?) She attracts those who want to appear to be different (hello mustard yellow...

The Digital Marketing News You Need To Read Sep22

The Digital Marketing News You Need To Read

The digital landscape is a constantly evolving one; once you have your finger on something, it begins to slip away, change, and become (almost) unrecognizable. What is this thing now in my hand that I no longer know how to use but once loved? (iOS 10, we’re looking at you). Then you start to feel old and just use Facebook.  But in all seriousness, the digital marketing-tech marriage is evolving far faster than we wish our Pokemon were. If we could report on every exciting trending Twitter topic, or every techy tabloid headline about who’s in the works for what, we would. But, it turns out, there are just SO many. So instead, here are the bigger changes in digital marketing that either happened recently or are in the works for near-future changes. And don’t worry, this won’t just be about VR.   1. Twitter gives us more characters Okay, not quite more characters per se, BUT it no longer attributes important aspects of a tweet (such as photos, GIFs, and @ replies) as part of its precious 140 characters. It is creative freedom at its truest form. No longer will the world need to stress over how to squeak in that oh-so-perfect GIF or worry about unnecessary two-part tweets when getting in an important argument with an online foe (*cough* Trump supporters). We could not be happier about this Twitter change.  [WPGP gif_id=”5982″ width=”600″] 2. Google unveils their digital assistant And we were all hoping it would be like Jarvis from Ironman. Because they showed up late to the game, everyone’s expectations are fairly high that their computer interaction will be slightly better than either of our good friends, Siri, Alexa, or Cortana. It works within Google’s new messaging app, Allo, and will soon appear as...

The Biggest Social Moments From The 2016 Rio Olympics Aug22

The Biggest Social Moments From The 2016 Rio Olympics

The Olympics is a unifying time like no other: Canadians once divided on economy or politics sit side-by-side in uniform red-and-white to cheer on the young Penny Oleksiak or hold their breathe for Andre de Grasse’s ten-second sprint. Said unified nation also takes to social to give their support, conversate with other supporters, and occasionally yell at an athlete or an opposing country. These are the most social games to date (does that surprise anyone?), with Twitter giving each sport its own hashtag emoji and with content going viral fairly easily. Here are our favourite viral moments from Rio 2016:    1. #PhelpsFace I know we all have our game faces but Michael Phelps just brings it to a-whole-nother level. The Internet immediately blew up, with many saying his anger was directed at competitor and previous gold medal winner, Chad le Clos. Not so, said Phelps in a later interview. He was apparently “in the zone” and just listening to pump-up music — which we can only assume was heavy metal or screamo.      2. The Fame of Fu Yuanhui The swimmer Fu Yuanhui gained MAJOR fame in Asia when she won a bronze medal in the 100m swim and had no idea during a post-race interview. The journalist was actually the one to tell her of her win, and her surprise is straight precious (see below). Her followers on Weibo (China’s #1 social platform) skyrocketed from 550,000 to 4 million fans following the darling interview. The goofy 20-year old is now being called “China’s Sweetheart” and we can’t wait to see more of her in interviews. Fu Yuanhui goofing around after her team won the relay’ Here's Our Favorite Olympian of Rio 2016 Fu Yuanhui is all of us (but 1000x more loveable)Don't ever change! #olympics #rio2016 #fuyuanhui Posted by...

LeaderLounge Recap: Brene Brown’s “Rising Strong” Jul28

LeaderLounge Recap: Brene Brown’s “Rising Strong”

Last night, our LeaderLounge took place in the absolutely fabulous Minami Restaurant, where we were dished Brene Brown wisdom with a side of sashimi. Our own Catherine Ducharme led us through the book itself, covering topics such as how vulnerability and courage are linked, how to face failure and come out strong (and #badass), and how the stories we create about others affects our judgment and generosity towards them. Talk about inspirational subjects. Bailey Heckel accompanied Catherine, with a three-part series of her own story regarding the rumble, the reckoning, and the revolution. Here’s what you missed last night if you couldn’t join us:   Vulnerability “Vulnerability is not weakness; it’s our greatest measure of courage.” – Brene Brown Are you that person who cries in public and is maybe a little too sensitive? Did you have to take personal leave from work and offer TMI to your boss? No thanks. I’ll pass. Brene Brown starts off straight away by challenging our understanding of vulnerability and why it can actually make us stronger, not weaker (which we always assume). Vulnerability breeds courage, and courage breeds further vulnerability. It’s a terrifying place that puts us out into the open, even though we may receive judgement, criticism, or public failure in front of our peers. But Brene Brown pushes us to believe that vulnerability is actually the birthplace of innovation, creativity, and meaningful change. So if we all want more courage and further innovation, why don’t we openly accept being vulnerable? "Vulnerability is not winning or losing, it's the #courage to show up and be seen when we have no control over the outcome." #leaderlounge — Smart Savvy (@smartsavvy) July 28, 2016 The Courage To Fail “If we are brave enough, often enough, we will fall.” – Brene...

Why Marketers Need To Pay Attention To Pokémon GO Jul15

Why Marketers Need To Pay Attention To Pokémon GO

In the past week our world has transitioned from Planet Earth into one giant Pokéball. We’ve all been captured by the augmented reality app Pokémon GO, with its 65 million (and counting) users, surpassing Tinder, Twitter, Facebook and Snapchat. It is THE most popular and most downloaded mobile game in history. People are so intently playing the game that they fall off of cliffs or walk onto highways. It’s evoked a passionate following – the kind every marketer dreams about (minus the hospital visits). Pokémon GO is a fantastic welcome to the powerful world of augmented reality and disruptive technology. It’s not only bypassing social media channels, but it’s essentially creating a new media channel unto its own. It’s a geologically-based platform that’s not just online anymore; it brings the passé lone video gamer in a basement into question and draws them out into the real world. It also plays on the inherent desire to be a part of a community especially while being entertained. Think Bachelorette-watching parties, #twitterchats, and Xbox Live headsets. They reinforce the idea that a technology will not do well if it completely isolates the user from other users. Pokemon GO brings the game to us, but it also brings us to one another. So what do marketers have to learn from Pikachu? 1. When done correctly, nostalgia can be your strongest marketing tool. You hardly need invest in extensive advertising to get your idea out there; it’s already out there in the hearts of thousands, and it’s your job to create a product that pulls that back to life. At one time millennials everywhere had their bedroom floors covered with Pokémon cards and a crush on Ash (or was that only me?). Rather than create a lacklustre remake series (sorry, Fuller House), or draw out...

3 Ways To Unlock Your Employees’ Potential

One of the greatest resources in corporate Canada is openly and unnecessarily going to waste. It’s not money, it’s not hydro-electricity and no, it’s not printer ink. It’s potential. These dynamic and multifaceted humans that work on your team may very well be, wait-for-it, good at more than just one thing. They’re not just sales-people. They could be a painting-golfing-analytical-with-a-side-of-novelist sales person. And marketers aren’t just marketers. They could be a behind-the-scenes mathematician or the founder of the next Snapchat. People are ripe with possibilities and potential. And as a leader, it’s your job to maximize on each team member’s individual potential. Here’s 3 simple ways to do that from the top:   1. Say “I Don’t Know” Leaders are often expected to have it all, know it all, and be walking encyclopedias of constant wisdom about their industry/market/product. But the reality is even leaders like Mark Zuckerberg don’t know everything. Saying “I don’t know” or “I’m not sure” at meetings should not be a stamp of failure but should instead be an encouraged part of your regimen. It opens up the floor for those thoughts and ideas that your team have been mentally wrestling with (or mentally rehearsing) to go public. It pulls them out of their “I’m listening to good ideas” mode into an “I’m collaborating with good ideas” mentality. When you pass the conch, it puts the onus on your employees to get creative with solutions and ideas, and it encourages potential to be discovered. You never know what hides in the silence of a boardroom — but it could be the next best idea (or even the next Facebook).   2. Ask About Spare Time That colleague that’s in sales but writes in his spare time? That graphic designer that does coding classes on her weekends? These are entire skill sets going...

The Number One Hiring Mistake That You’re Probably Making Jun08

The Number One Hiring Mistake That You’re Probably Making

First impressions are powerful ~ will the first date pave way for a second? Will the business card exchange lead to a sale? Can the eager interviewee transform sweaty palms and dry mouth into career magic? In fact, first impressions are so paramount you’re probably weighing if this article is worth reading solely based on my first sentences. (How am I doing so far?) Along with getting second dates and sales leads, first impressions are also, unfortunately, the common denominator of many bad hiring decisions. According to Monster, many recruiters derive go/no -go conclusions within the first six minutes of an interview, and many say the first 90 seconds are imperative for making a good first impression. Even more alarming, one study in 2000 revealed that judgments made in the first 10 seconds of an interview could predict the outcome of the interview. From a hiring perspective, these quick, uncognitive, and emotional decisions are a disaster and contribute to about 50% of hiring mistakes. In fact, from any perspective these quick decisions can lead to disaster. Imagine applying this philosophy to anything else in your life: would 10 seconds be enough to buy a car, choose a spouse, or decide you even want the new job you’re interviewing for? Would 6 minutes even be enough? (We’re hoping you’re saying no at this point.) We think we can tell a lot about a person quickly — we have this bias that makes us think we can tell a person’s Myers-Briggs, Birkman, and Kolbe scores just by the way they smile or shake a hand. But we can’t; vital decisions, like hiring, retention, and the makeup of a team, should not be made within the blink (or a few blinks) of an eye. Hiring requires contemplation, deep thought, and most of all, money. Hiring on an impulse is costly not only financially, but to your team, and, let’s...

e-LeaderLounge: SCRUM

Last night we kicked off another full house LeaderLounge, taking over Salt Tasting Room with our Leaders are Readers book study that focused on mastering the SCRUM methodology. Presenter Peter Reek unpacked the 256 pages of Jeff Sutherland’s Scrum: The Art of Doing Twice the Work in Half the Time while Joseph Thompson (VP, Marketing & Communications @ BuildDirect) gave annotated examples of how to apply SCRUM both at work and at home. (His example? Why, he even used SCRUM with his construction team while renovating his house).  Scrum is a weird word — we’re convinced it’s an onomatopoeia — but if you’re a rugby fan you’ll be very familiar with this word. It’s a play that happens during rugby (see right) to gain possession of the ball. As Jeff Sutherland writes in the book, “The term comes from the game of rugby, and it refers to the way a team works together to move the ball down the field. Careful alignment, unity of purpose, and clarity of goal come together. It’s the perfect metaphor for what teams should do.” SCRUM Methodology, then, is a particular form of project/product management that involves close team collaboration and daily or weekly ‘huddles’ to check in. SCRUM essentially aims to create a structure around the learning process and allow the team to inspect, adapt, and improve throughout it.  1. The Agile Manifesto The backbone of SCRUM is the Agile Manifesto, defined by four principles: People over process Products that actually work, over documenting what the product is supposed to do Collaborating with customers over negotiating with them Responding to change over following a plan   2. Daily Scrum Just like in rugby, SCRUM is pieced together by players who play important roles: the product owner, the SCRUM master, and the surrounding team who support the vision of the product owner. As Joseph...

Recap Of Our “Leaders Eat Last” LeaderLounge

n Sept 30, our LeaderLounge took to Simon Sinek’s “Leader’s Eat Last,” to delve in and digest just exactly what the word “leadership” entails. We had a fantastic showing of some Vancouver’s greatest marketers in the audience, as well as one on stage whom walked us through a case study of leadership during transitory and difficult times (thanks Angela Scardillo). If you attended our event and want a little recap, OR if you’re suffering from FOMO and simply must know what took place, here’s some highlights from our LeaderLounge event.   1. Managing vs. Leading Simon Sinek pushes the idea that the true cost of leadership privilege comes at the expense of self-interest. In order to succeed in the long run, organizations must build environments in which people truly matter and train people to be great LEADERS, not just “effective managers.”  Sacrifice the numbers to take care of the people. #LeaderLounge — Wisam Abdulla (@RealWisam) October 1, 2015 Best   2. Treat Employees Like People If leaders treat employees with trust, it creates a sense of obligation and a sense of pride. Work becomes a place to feel valued and employees will work together to achieve goals and hit targets. A leader that serves others wins in the long term #LeadersEatLast #LeaderLounge — Christine Nathaniel (@stinesupreme) October 1, 2015 "Firing is the easy option. Tough love, coaching all require more time and attention" #LeaderLounge — Smart Savvy (@smartsavvy) October 1, 2015 3. Look Past The Numbers When our relationships with our customers or employees become abstract, we naturally pursue the most tangible thing we can see — the metrics. If you place value on numbers more than lives, you’re more than likely separated from the people you’ve been called to serve. The further away, the less...

Highlights of Our Conversation-Centered LeaderLounge

Think back to the last time you were on a flight beside a fellow human being. You choose to engage. You make small talk, cover the who’s who, and then the topics slowly become more challenging. What to say next? Can a conversation end if you’re sitting side-by-side someone for 4 hours? Is silence okay? And, dare say, do you tap the other person on the shoulder if they’re knee-deep in a book or have their headphones in to continue said conversation? (Yeah, never.) Conversation is a human novelty with very specific, yet unwritten rules. Humour is funny until a certain un-said but universally known point. Confidence is always an attractive quality in a converser, until it very slowly begins to edge over the line to arrogance. Listening is a great conversational skill, except when it becomes overactive listening and a “let-me-finish-your-sentence” annoyance. All of these, as well as the anatomy of a conversation and the 6 laws of great dialogue, were covered last night at our third #LeaderLounge event. Our own Peter Reek teamed up with Catherine Ducharme of OutsideIn Communications to help guide leaders in generating excellent conversational and storytelling skills. If you weren’t there last night, here’s what you missed. Getting started at the @smartsavvy #LeaderLounge pic.twitter.com/vLpHcNr8HN — Ryan Hanawalt (@ryanhanawalt) July 30, 2015 For starters: The basic building blocks of a conversation. It’s a fine balance between give and take, push and pull, back and forth, and is akin to a volleyball game or sandwich-making. (One person slathers on the butter, another piles on slices of cheese, and then out of left field someone adds a spicy jalapeno.) And yes, it all begins with a healthy dose of small talk and an understanding that every conversation is an opportunity of some kind.   ...