Three Interview Blindspots You Need To Know About Dec08

Three Interview Blindspots You Need To Know About

Mirror Mirror on the wall – who is the fairest of them all? When it comes to interviewing candidates, being fair should be the top requirement of every hiring manager’s list. The expectation is that each candidate is assessed solely on their credentials and experiences. Although this is the expectation, it is not necessarily what is happening behind the scenes… … truth is – we are human. And, being human means we have blind spots; areas of being and acting and feeling and interviewing that we cannot see. This blog is to help you — the reader, the interviewer, the human — uncover and make aware of 3 important interview biases . Once you can spot them, you can acknowledge and recognize when it is happening. This will allow you to make more informed decisions when looking for the ideal candidate, and will enable you to truly be the fairest of them all.   1. Similarity-Attraction Bias AKA the “I like you because you are like me” bias. The saying that “opposites attract” could be true, but with the underlying tones of the similarity-attraction bias, it is very rare that we will give this opposite person a chance – especially in the workplace. There’s an internal magnetic attraction when we interact with somebody like ourselves. We have a particular bias that causes us to be attracted to people that are like us: extroverts are attracted extroverts, marketers like marketers, GoT fans pull in other GoT fans. It makes relating to one another far easier and can help us create common ground. That said, with all of its good intentions, it can put quite the hook in the hiring process. When we are drawn to people who are like us, we start hiring on grounds of “I...

How To Effectively Read A Resume Sep14

How To Effectively Read A Resume

So you have a pile of resumes on your desk — wait, scratch that, this is 2016. So you have an inbox with hundreds of unread emails, and they’re all from candidates interested in working for  your  organization. Cover letters, resumes, portfolios. How will you know if they’re a fit for your position and your organization overall? Here’s how to read between the lines, interpret off the paper, and effectively understand a person’s resume: Don’t Jump To Conclusions Resumes are a story. It is easy to read what’s there and harder to uncover what’s not. Encourage yourself to DIG DEEPER! Gaps between positions and/or career trails don’t always make sense. Don’t let this scare you. There’s almost always a reasonable explanation; consider contract work (the candidate may not have stated this on his/her resume); a Master’s degree (blank space in career may be a forward-move in education/skills); or an illness (people get sick – they also get better). Give the candidate the benefit of the doubt to avoid the assumption that it was because the candidate was an unwanted commodity on the job market. Know Your Companies There should be a part of your brain marked “Glassdoor,” filled with reputations and reviews of the companies in your city and your space — the good, the bad, and the ugly. Before a candidate says “YES” they hopefully have done research themselves on your company. Knowing where a candidate chooses to work will help you better understand how selective they have been and will also give you a window into the types of cultures and companies they work well in. Look for patterns and allow for one-offs. How Important Is Progression? Career progression should be high on your “should-haves” list. You want to see clear advancement; someone who is climbing upwards either within the same...