Deloitte Survey: What Millenials Want In 2017 Feb09

Deloitte Survey: What Millenials Want In 2017

Major studies revealing trends in the workplace can help us all be better leaders. That’s why we get excited when Deloitte releases its annual survey on millennials – the aggregation of nearly 8,000 interviews of millennials employed full-time in 30 countries worldwide. While most of us lack the resources, time and commitment to gather this kind of info, the results are worth pouring over – especially if retaining and motivating staff is on your radar. Here are our key learnings on what Millennials want from their workplace and how to keep them engaged and empowered:   Millennials are frightened but not idle. In 2016, Deloitte reported an alarming “loyalty gap” amongst 18-to-34-year-olds. The 2017 antidote? An increasingly unstable world. Yes, the current climate of divisive politics and looming threats have found millennials more inclined (by ten whole percentage points) to stay put. They’re shaken, but not ide. Millennials feel accountable and want to contribute to good causes – and they think their workplaces are a great place to start. When offered the chance to get involved in community groups or non-profits, millennials feel influential and empowered, which in turn translates into loyalty. Without purpose, only one out of five report being satisfied at work. The more we work together, the happier millennials will be High personal accountability paired with a “liberal/relaxed” management structure is the preferred environment for 76% of millennials.   When it comes to coaching, they want to hear “plain, straight-talking language.” They welcome passionate opinions but cringe when business leaders take controversial or divisive positions that drive wedges. “Collaborative,” “consensual,” “inclusive” are the kind of words Millennials want to use when describing your 9 am scrum, all-hands or strategic planning. And they’re even ready and willing to mentor the up-and-coming Gen Y’ers...

The 3 Must-Haves Of Any Team Player (And We Mean Musts) Jan18

The 3 Must-Haves Of Any Team Player (And We Mean Musts)

At Smart Savvy, we’ve long prescribed to the 3-way mirror rule of recruitment: check every angle. Now we have a new take: the 3-legged stool. That’s because we read a book: The Ideal Team Player: How To Cultivate the Three Essential Virtues by NYT best-selling author, Patrick Lencioni. (In fact, we liked the book so much that we bought a copy for all of our clients. Exhibit A: one of our happy recipients.) Building on his brilliant guide to the five major dysfunctions of a team, Lencioni’s newest “business fable” takes a closer look at the individuals who populate your pack. What makes a person a true and consistent “value-add”? What causes them to detract?   Humble, Hungry and Smart: The Ideal Team Player   According to Lencioni, once you check off the baseline “stuff” (technical skills,  experience, personal hygiene), the ultimate success of any new/current hire depends on three, crucial personality traits: Humble – Leaves their ego at the door. Not “overly arrogant” and not meek. Possesses BOTH the humility to champion others and the self-confidence to bring ideas to the table. Level 5 leader. Hungry – “Self diligent and motivated.” Internally driven. Tackles problems and projects with a sense of urgency and for the “good of the team.”   Smart – Simply put, people smarts. “Appropriate and aware.” Helps team members feel “appreciated and understood” even in tough love situations. The crux? All three virtues are non-negotiable. Teammates who lack even one are unbalanced and pose great challenges to both the team’s health and the organizations’ productivity. For example: If you’re hiring for a sales role, Lencioni warns that you might excuse an oversized ego for what you see as a valuable dose of hungry. You know, the #goalcrusher who polarises teammates....

Career Resolutions for 2017 You’ll Want to Steal (and Actually Keep) Jan11

Career Resolutions for 2017 You’ll Want to Steal (and Actually Keep)

Rolling into 2017 without a resolutions list? Fear not. We asked a few top marketing, sales and HR professionals from Vancouver (and beyond) where they’ll be investing their time and energy this year. Read their replies to get your ideas flowing for a new year and new you.  “This 2017, I resolve to…..” Focus on the fundamentals  Get more sleep. Drink more water. Prioritize relationships IRL. Work within my “circle of influence” (without wasting energy on things that are not). And always take the default position of assuming the best of people. We’re all trying to navigate our way to success in challenging times – and we all deserve the “benefit of the doubt.”   – Rich Workman, Sales Manager, NA West, Sophos Inc. Slow down and breathe.  In 2017, I will be more focused on taking strategic breaks to reflect, think things through in a quiet space, and breathe deeply on a more regular basis throughout each day. Easy to say, hard to do, but I know my best work is done from a thoughtful, present state of mind. That’s my one big resolution for a successful year ahead.  – Dorit Shackleton VP, Head of Integration, Global Corporate Affairs, SAP Favour quality over quantity  I love my line of work and the people and organizations I get to work with – so much so that I I have a really hard time saying ‘no’ when new opportunities arise. But all that “yes’ can dilute my good intentions. I’m working towards achieving a work-life balance, and being confident in saying ‘no’ will be an important step in reaching that goal. – Bianca Bujan, Owner, Bee Communications  Be pro-social Things are getting faster and faster every day. What I believe we need now more than ever is community:...

How To Have Better Conversations Oct20

How To Have Better Conversations

We’ve heard enough about the weather already. Clouds can only be so exciting and blue sky is, well, always blue. It’s time to charter into new and unknown topics – into conversations  that are memorable, intellectually stimulating, and unforgettable. So how exactly do you walk away from an interaction feeling like you’re the Oprah of conversation? There are a few unspoken rules that need to be in place for you to begin.   1. A little give, a little take Conversations are two-way, like a see saw. They are about asking questions and about sharing information – back and forth. They are an opportunity for someone to get to know you and you to know them so don’t just answer the question – elaborate a little then ask a question back. After a good conversation you should know something about the person and they should know something about you. If you don’t, you’ve either been interrogating the person (too may questions) or you’ve been talking all about yourself (which fails to impress).   2. Love the small talk Drop the old “I hate small talk” adage. No you don’t. I mean, do you really want to jump into a deeply personal discussion with a complete stranger? Bring up your personal philosophies, your religio-politico thoughts, your marriage troubles? Didn’t think so. Small talk is an essential part of a conversation, it’s how you break the ice. It’s the diving board to jump off and jump in. It helps you find common ground and gives you clues and cues about the person you’re speaking to. Think current events, sports finals, the US Election (okay, that one might be a little dangerous) and what you do for work.   3. Find commonalities As soon as you find...

Conversation Starters Oct20

Conversation Starters

Wondering how to break the ice when you meet a new person at a networking event or are stuck beside someone on an airplane? Not sure how to take your conversation beyond the classic few “how are you/who are you” questions? Tuck a few of these intriguing, next-level questions in your back pocket, and you’ll be perfectly prepared: How do you make decisions when the stakes are high? What do you think is better – to be considered nice or to interesting? A living legend. Who comes to mind for you? If you won a huge sum of money, what would you no longer do? Who is your worst imaginable marriage partner? What do you consider to be the best work you’ve done? Are the best five years of your career ahead of you or behind you? Is there a piece of music you consider special? Why? Who’s the most creative person you know? Tell me about the first car you ever bought? If you could travel to the past in a time machine, what advice would you give to the 12 year-old you? Who has offered you the most useful career advice? If you had to live somewhere else, where would you live? What makes a person a good travelling companion? Tell me about a decision you made that has had a major effect on your life? What’s the most you’ve ever spent on a pair of shoes? (Did they end up being your favourites?) What is your favorite way to spend a Saturday? Did/do you have a nickname – what’s the story behind it? If you could create your own nickname what would it be? If you could revisit one day in your life, which day would it be? Would you rather...

What’s Your Story? Our 5-Step Elevator Pitch Builder Sep08

What’s Your Story? Our 5-Step Elevator Pitch Builder

One of my first questions when screening a new candidate is: can you give me a two-minute overview on you? The first reaction is often awkwardness – the kind of awkward that ensues when people give their LinkedIn profile the 3rd person treatment. I include the words “two minute” for an elevator pitch because most people need a time frame. I think it helps give the impression that the ‘story’ I am asking for should be succinct, short, and to the point. I don’t specify “professional background” because I’m curious to see how you respond. But what do I hear? Despite the running cliché of mirror-practiced elevator pitches and major networking fails, most people lack the ability to answer this simple, focused question: who are you and why are you here? Here’s what I usually get in reply: Dazed and Confused: Do you mean about me, as a person, or my work history? I’m definitely not asking about your romantic history, so let’s just agree-to-agree that— at least in this professional setting — you (as a person) and you (as in your work history) are one in the same. Ramble On: Long, rambling, high in detail, low in focus, and uncomfortably hazy in end point. You lost me somewhere between where you were born, your first job in high school and your latest management philosophy. I am still not sure what’s important and what’s not. Total Recall: A chronological breakdown of one’s work history, often recited bullet-for-bullet from their hard copy resume. One word: redundant. Appetizer. Movie Trailer. Elevator pitch. Do you see a pattern? They’re all a bite-sized sampler of the bigger picture – all meant to entice, spark interest, and act as a sales mechanism for what’s to come. Likewise, when I ask for your two-minute personal overview, I...

The Strongest Influencers On Your Career Path Aug11

The Strongest Influencers On Your Career Path

As we grow into adults we discover everyone has a narrative — their own story comprised of personal battles, discoveries, successes and failures. Here at Smart Savvy, we try to understand those stories in-depth so we can effectively understand and place our candidates. We ask the following of our candidates: “Please plot 6-8 key life/career developments that have helped shape you into the person you are today.” On one end of the timeline is ‘The day you were born,’ on the other end, ‘Today.’  9/10 people love it. In five years, we have only had one person struggle to the point of not being capable of completing it.  So what have we learned from our candidates’ stories? The old adage “people are more alike than different” holds true when it comes to people’s personal stories. Here are the commonalities that stood out as consistent themes in one’s life (and career), supplemented by excerpts from individual’s answers:   1. Cross-Culture Experiences + Travel What’s more humbling, entertaining, and possibly frustrating, then not even being able to ask for a glass of water or have small talk about the weather? Travel turns us on our heads in terms of what we know about language, culture, a dining experience, etc. It educates us in a way that no classroom ever could, both about ourselves and the world around us.  [slideshare id=64916675&doc=travelexperiences-160811181724]   2. Post-Secondary Education The whole university experience is an unforgettable one: all-nighters, varsity sports, finals, and walking the stage when it’s all done and over with. This is a time in life to simply learn; be the proverbial sponge; and figure out what your passions, strengths, and motivations are.  [slideshare id=64916782&doc=university-160811182113]   3. Performance + Achievements Of course our successes are a fundamental part of our...

LeaderLounge Recap: Brene Brown’s “Rising Strong” Jul28

LeaderLounge Recap: Brene Brown’s “Rising Strong”

Last night, our LeaderLounge took place in the absolutely fabulous Minami Restaurant, where we were dished Brene Brown wisdom with a side of sashimi. Our own Catherine Ducharme led us through the book itself, covering topics such as how vulnerability and courage are linked, how to face failure and come out strong (and #badass), and how the stories we create about others affects our judgment and generosity towards them. Talk about inspirational subjects. Bailey Heckel accompanied Catherine, with a three-part series of her own story regarding the rumble, the reckoning, and the revolution. Here’s what you missed last night if you couldn’t join us:   Vulnerability “Vulnerability is not weakness; it’s our greatest measure of courage.” – Brene Brown Are you that person who cries in public and is maybe a little too sensitive? Did you have to take personal leave from work and offer TMI to your boss? No thanks. I’ll pass. Brene Brown starts off straight away by challenging our understanding of vulnerability and why it can actually make us stronger, not weaker (which we always assume). Vulnerability breeds courage, and courage breeds further vulnerability. It’s a terrifying place that puts us out into the open, even though we may receive judgement, criticism, or public failure in front of our peers. But Brene Brown pushes us to believe that vulnerability is actually the birthplace of innovation, creativity, and meaningful change. So if we all want more courage and further innovation, why don’t we openly accept being vulnerable? "Vulnerability is not winning or losing, it's the #courage to show up and be seen when we have no control over the outcome." #leaderlounge — Smart Savvy (@smartsavvy) July 28, 2016 The Courage To Fail “If we are brave enough, often enough, we will fall.” – Brene...

Why Marketers Need To Pay Attention To Pokémon GO Jul15

Why Marketers Need To Pay Attention To Pokémon GO

In the past week our world has transitioned from Planet Earth into one giant Pokéball. We’ve all been captured by the augmented reality app Pokémon GO, with its 65 million (and counting) users, surpassing Tinder, Twitter, Facebook and Snapchat. It is THE most popular and most downloaded mobile game in history. People are so intently playing the game that they fall off of cliffs or walk onto highways. It’s evoked a passionate following – the kind every marketer dreams about (minus the hospital visits). Pokémon GO is a fantastic welcome to the powerful world of augmented reality and disruptive technology. It’s not only bypassing social media channels, but it’s essentially creating a new media channel unto its own. It’s a geologically-based platform that’s not just online anymore; it brings the passé lone video gamer in a basement into question and draws them out into the real world. It also plays on the inherent desire to be a part of a community especially while being entertained. Think Bachelorette-watching parties, #twitterchats, and Xbox Live headsets. They reinforce the idea that a technology will not do well if it completely isolates the user from other users. Pokemon GO brings the game to us, but it also brings us to one another. So what do marketers have to learn from Pikachu? 1. When done correctly, nostalgia can be your strongest marketing tool. You hardly need invest in extensive advertising to get your idea out there; it’s already out there in the hearts of thousands, and it’s your job to create a product that pulls that back to life. At one time millennials everywhere had their bedroom floors covered with Pokémon cards and a crush on Ash (or was that only me?). Rather than create a lacklustre remake series (sorry, Fuller House), or draw out...

Why Starting a Career in Sales Pays Dividends Jul07

Why Starting a Career in Sales Pays Dividends

Do the words ‘cold-call’ or ‘sales pitch’ make your palms shake in fear? Do you shy away from job descriptions with the word ‘commission?’ To many new grads, sales is the dreadful career path of absolute last resort. Too often, a career in sales is disregarded before giving it a fair go.  If you’ve never pictured yourself starting a career in sales, you may want to reconsider what you’re leaving out. Not only does a career in sales give you the opportunity to earn more than a capped income, but more importantly it teaches you life-long transferable skills. At the end of the day, everything revolves around some form of transaction. By starting your sales career early on, you can learn valuable skills that separate you from the competition and that apply to any career path you may find yourself on. Ask yourself, do you want to invest in a career that continues to pay dividends years down the road?   Input in. Input out. A career in sales gives you the opportunity to have your hard work pay off. What other career do you get to see direct results and reap the benefits of your blood, sweat and (occasional) tears? With a career in sales, the results of your efforts are tangible, in both quotas and commissions, and you have the potential to make more than $100K per year. Unlike most jobs, the harder you work, the more you can make.   Set Goals. Reach. Repeat. Learn to set goals, eat targets for breakfast, and then do it over and over again. Sales positions have performance metrics that are clearly defined and easily measured. Although this may seem intimidating at first, once you learn how to set goals and blow them out of...