Three Interview Blindspots You Need To Know About Dec08

Three Interview Blindspots You Need To Know About

Mirror Mirror on the wall – who is the fairest of them all? When it comes to interviewing candidates, being fair should be the top requirement of every hiring manager’s list. The expectation is that each candidate is assessed solely on their credentials and experiences. Although this is the expectation, it is not necessarily what is happening behind the scenes… … truth is – we are human. And, being human means we have blind spots; areas of being and acting and feeling and interviewing that we cannot see. This blog is to help you — the reader, the interviewer, the human — uncover and make aware of 3 important interview biases . Once you can spot them, you can acknowledge and recognize when it is happening. This will allow you to make more informed decisions when looking for the ideal candidate, and will enable you to truly be the fairest of them all.   1. Similarity-Attraction Bias AKA the “I like you because you are like me” bias. The saying that “opposites attract” could be true, but with the underlying tones of the similarity-attraction bias, it is very rare that we will give this opposite person a chance – especially in the workplace. There’s an internal magnetic attraction when we interact with somebody like ourselves. We have a particular bias that causes us to be attracted to people that are like us: extroverts are attracted extroverts, marketers like marketers, GoT fans pull in other GoT fans. It makes relating to one another far easier and can help us create common ground. That said, with all of its good intentions, it can put quite the hook in the hiring process. When we are drawn to people who are like us, we start hiring on grounds of “I...

Using Psychometric Tests During The Hiring Process Sep01

Using Psychometric Tests During The Hiring Process

How would you describe your hiring process? Intuitive? Personal? Subjective? What about technical or scientific?  The next time you hire, you may want to consider getting to know your candidate from a new perspective by inviting them to take a personality or aptitude test. More and more, the recruitment industry and HR departments are looking to data to help legitimize the hiring process through talent measurement tools called ‘psychometrics.’   WHAT Some of these tests have gained notoriety over the years, such as personality test Myers-Briggs which ranks individuals on four distinct areas (but is actually not recommended for hiring purposes). Others, such as the Birkman (a must-do for internal employees at Smart Savvy) assesses both personality and behaviour, and gives a comprehensive overview of how you work and where your career strengths are. There’s also the Kolbe, DISC, EQ-i, and StrengthsFinder (which we’re hosting a LeaderLounge session on in September, if you’ve ever wondered how to put your strengths into play in the workforce.)    WHEN Hiring managers and recruitment firms use psychometric tests varyingly. You may encounter them: After an initial resume screening (this method helps recruiters and HR managers weed through piles of resumes before moving forward to in-person interviews) As part of the interview process (either used in the decision-making process or used not for selection but rather simply to facilitate discussion) In the final stages of candidate deliberation (to truly assess one candidate against another and seek further evidence of personality traits or strengths that were not satisfied in conversation).   WHY Some believe that psychometrics can be used to add to the candidate experience and ensure that how they’re treated during the hiring process is nothing but fair. Rather than making gut instinct decisions, decisions become founded on test results and concrete information afforded by the candidate themselves. These tests also save the...

The Most Common Mistakes Hiring Managers Make Aug15

The Most Common Mistakes Hiring Managers Make

Do you talk more than a job candidate during an interview? Do you hire carbon copies of yourself and end up with a team of people just like you? Do you hire solely for cultural fit rather than skill set? We’ve seen it all before: Well-intentioned hires that become quick mistakes.  In this video, Horizon Recruitment interviews 3 industry experts on hiring (including our own Peter Reek #humblebrag, as well as Warren Smith of The Counsel Network, and Feras Elkhalil of IQ/IT Tech Recruiters) and where the gaps lay between HR and the job candidate. With many years of acquired knowledge, we lay out common mistakes that we’ve seen in hiring, and how to put a better foot forward in terms of interviewing and hiring. Anyone (and we mean anyone) involved in HR, hiring, or the onboarding process, should see this video.   [embedyt] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3PP64jF5mmw[/embedyt]   Here are a few Sparksnotes for you from the video itself if you’re not a Youtube person.  Common Mistakes Made By HR Managers: The “I’ll know it when I see it” mistake. Know what you’re looking for before starting out on an interviewing spree. The tyranny of the urgent error. The urgent things of the day get your attention but the important things get put to the bottom of the list. Make hiring a priority and talk to your clients or candidates before 4:30 pm in the day.  Hiring people similar to yourself. Good teams need complementary skill sets and diversity in order to be a stronger collective.  Common Mistakes During The Interview: The one-sided mistake. You’re not there for airtime, you are there to facilitate a conversation and learn as much as possible about the job candidate. They are evaluating you as much as you’re evaluating them.  Lack of preparation. Know what you’re looking...

How To Spot A Future Sales Maven Aug03

How To Spot A Future Sales Maven

Grit. Resilience. Drive. Three words that separate the hunters from the gatherers. Three qualities that separate the gold medal from the participation ribbon. We all want to hire candidates that embody each of these qualities, but how can you spot your next sales guru? We all want to see those three things on a resume and in an interview, but how can you be sure your candidate is a walking version of the job description? Here are a few key ingredients to look for when making your next sales hire. Relationship Builder Bottom line: people don’t want to be sold a product. They want to be sold an experience, and only people can offer that. Developing strong, consultative relationships with clients in order to find solutions to their business problems is how one #wins at sales. Ask yourself: what is their network like? How many connections do they have on LinkedIn – and real life? How natural are they around people? Candidates with strong relationship building skills and a focus on making a difference rather than a dollar are key to look for. Coachability Hire athletes and train them into salespeople. Athletes are used to being coached, living off of feedback, and trying again and again until they get it. A willingness to learn is an important quality to look for in any hire – so if you find driven individuals that are open to feedback and personal development, do your best to pursue them and get them on YOUR team (not someone else’s). Ensure your recruiters use sports search terms when recruiting for sales positions; you won’t regret it. Initiative Seek out go-getters. Plain and simple – find people that make it happen, rather than wait for it to happen. Look for candidates...

The Number One Hiring Mistake That You’re Probably Making Jun08

The Number One Hiring Mistake That You’re Probably Making

First impressions are powerful ~ will the first date pave way for a second? Will the business card exchange lead to a sale? Can the eager interviewee transform sweaty palms and dry mouth into career magic? In fact, first impressions are so paramount you’re probably weighing if this article is worth reading solely based on my first sentences. (How am I doing so far?) Along with getting second dates and sales leads, first impressions are also, unfortunately, the common denominator of many bad hiring decisions. According to Monster, many recruiters derive go/no -go conclusions within the first six minutes of an interview, and many say the first 90 seconds are imperative for making a good first impression. Even more alarming, one study in 2000 revealed that judgments made in the first 10 seconds of an interview could predict the outcome of the interview. From a hiring perspective, these quick, uncognitive, and emotional decisions are a disaster and contribute to about 50% of hiring mistakes. In fact, from any perspective these quick decisions can lead to disaster. Imagine applying this philosophy to anything else in your life: would 10 seconds be enough to buy a car, choose a spouse, or decide you even want the new job you’re interviewing for? Would 6 minutes even be enough? (We’re hoping you’re saying no at this point.) We think we can tell a lot about a person quickly — we have this bias that makes us think we can tell a person’s Myers-Briggs, Birkman, and Kolbe scores just by the way they smile or shake a hand. But we can’t; vital decisions, like hiring, retention, and the makeup of a team, should not be made within the blink (or a few blinks) of an eye. Hiring requires contemplation, deep thought, and most of all, money. Hiring on an impulse is costly not only financially, but to your team, and, let’s...