Three Interview Blindspots You Need To Know About Dec08

Three Interview Blindspots You Need To Know About

Mirror Mirror on the wall – who is the fairest of them all? When it comes to interviewing candidates, being fair should be the top requirement of every hiring manager’s list. The expectation is that each candidate is assessed solely on their credentials and experiences. Although this is the expectation, it is not necessarily what is happening behind the scenes… … truth is – we are human. And, being human means we have blind spots; areas of being and acting and feeling and interviewing that we cannot see. This blog is to help you — the reader, the interviewer, the human — uncover and make aware of 3 important interview biases . Once you can spot them, you can acknowledge and recognize when it is happening. This will allow you to make more informed decisions when looking for the ideal candidate, and will enable you to truly be the fairest of them all.   1. Similarity-Attraction Bias AKA the “I like you because you are like me” bias. The saying that “opposites attract” could be true, but with the underlying tones of the similarity-attraction bias, it is very rare that we will give this opposite person a chance – especially in the workplace. There’s an internal magnetic attraction when we interact with somebody like ourselves. We have a particular bias that causes us to be attracted to people that are like us: extroverts are attracted extroverts, marketers like marketers, GoT fans pull in other GoT fans. It makes relating to one another far easier and can help us create common ground. That said, with all of its good intentions, it can put quite the hook in the hiring process. When we are drawn to people who are like us, we start hiring on grounds of “I...

How To Have Better Conversations Oct20

How To Have Better Conversations

We’ve heard enough about the weather already. Clouds can only be so exciting and blue sky is, well, always blue. It’s time to charter into new and unknown topics – into conversations  that are memorable, intellectually stimulating, and unforgettable. So how exactly do you walk away from an interaction feeling like you’re the Oprah of conversation? There are a few unspoken rules that need to be in place for you to begin.   1. A little give, a little take Conversations are two-way, like a see saw. They are about asking questions and about sharing information – back and forth. They are an opportunity for someone to get to know you and you to know them so don’t just answer the question – elaborate a little then ask a question back. After a good conversation you should know something about the person and they should know something about you. If you don’t, you’ve either been interrogating the person (too may questions) or you’ve been talking all about yourself (which fails to impress).   2. Love the small talk Drop the old “I hate small talk” adage. No you don’t. I mean, do you really want to jump into a deeply personal discussion with a complete stranger? Bring up your personal philosophies, your religio-politico thoughts, your marriage troubles? Didn’t think so. Small talk is an essential part of a conversation, it’s how you break the ice. It’s the diving board to jump off and jump in. It helps you find common ground and gives you clues and cues about the person you’re speaking to. Think current events, sports finals, the US Election (okay, that one might be a little dangerous) and what you do for work.   3. Find commonalities As soon as you find...

Conversation Starters Oct20

Conversation Starters

Wondering how to break the ice when you meet a new person at a networking event or are stuck beside someone on an airplane? Not sure how to take your conversation beyond the classic few “how are you/who are you” questions? Tuck a few of these intriguing, next-level questions in your back pocket, and you’ll be perfectly prepared: How do you make decisions when the stakes are high? What do you think is better – to be considered nice or to interesting? A living legend. Who comes to mind for you? If you won a huge sum of money, what would you no longer do? Who is your worst imaginable marriage partner? What do you consider to be the best work you’ve done? Are the best five years of your career ahead of you or behind you? Is there a piece of music you consider special? Why? Who’s the most creative person you know? Tell me about the first car you ever bought? If you could travel to the past in a time machine, what advice would you give to the 12 year-old you? Who has offered you the most useful career advice? If you had to live somewhere else, where would you live? What makes a person a good travelling companion? Tell me about a decision you made that has had a major effect on your life? What’s the most you’ve ever spent on a pair of shoes? (Did they end up being your favourites?) What is your favorite way to spend a Saturday? Did/do you have a nickname – what’s the story behind it? If you could create your own nickname what would it be? If you could revisit one day in your life, which day would it be? Would you rather...

Love Monday #49: How to Fail-Forward

Pop quiz: Vancouver’s current weather forecast is best represented by which Oscar nominee? If you guessed Disney’s big screen comeback “Frozen”, then you should definitely be part of our Smart Savvy Oscar Pool Contest. It’s open to all, with four top prizes of $100, $75 and $50 movie gift cards up for grabs (plus bragging rights). Maybe your career or your current team is feeling a little bit frozen itself?  Here are five #LoveMonday links to keep your skills hot and avoid a career ice-age.   Competition and Your Career – “A rising tide raises all boats,” said a cinema expert about the feverish competition amongst animation studios today. Perhaps the same logic can be used for your career and the other rising stars in your organization? Do you fear competition from your colleagues or do you use it to drive your performance? Here’s why competition int he workplace might be a good thing. … Can LinkedIn get you a job and what is Twitter good for? Listen to Networking in Vancouver founder, Jen Schaeffers and LinkedIn Trainer, Trevor Turnbull, share how they leverage the top social media networks for professionals via CKNW’s Bill Good Show. Excellent insights in the online and networking habits of three outstanding local leaders. … The Two Basic Mindsets that Shape your Life. Believing that your personality, traits or even simple “luck” are carved in stone can place serious limits on your potential. Stanford psychologist, Carol Dweck says we must shed the “fixed-mindset” for a belief system that values fail-forward growth above all. … Get Your Own Attention. Learn Something New. The act of learning reminds us that we have skills to grow on and much more to do. If you don’t have time for weaving class, try reading for 15-minutes before red. Here’s Amazon’s list of 100 Book to Read in a Lifetime.  … “You...

Do You Know What’s Important? Dec25

Do You Know What’s Important?

“How did you go bankrupt? Gradually, then suddenly.” – Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises Raising kids is the leading case study in gradually-suddenly theory. It goes like this: each meal, each bedtime, each walk to the mailbox is steeped in slowness, but they’re all bullet trains to adulthood. I learned this old-adage the hard way when I saw my first daughter get married this summer. One moment, she was still a kid and then…she was fully grown. I was ecstatic for her. I was floored. I was gradually letting go and then suddenly a father-in-law. Likewise, careers are funny children. They grow up slowly and then quickly. The have growth spurts and angry periods and times of great joy and unsettling complexity. You forget to watch them for a month or two, head buried in life’s other work, and they’re suddenly in a very different place. On the brink of major milestones. On the edge of major drops. A Director of Marketing in his mid-thirties recently came to me looking for a new challenge. I asked him what kind of role he was targeting, what direction he wanted to take. He confided to me, “Director of Marketing was the plan.” For him, the question of What’s next? was a heavy one. An overwhelming one. And the next logical stop, CMO or other high-level position, left him with a “meh” feeling. He’d been so squarely focused on the sudden that, by the time he got there, he felt little sense of having earned or accomplished the feat. The needle had moved, but to where? An Australian mom-blogger hit the nail on the head for me: “We each face sudden declines. Moments where we realise what we’ve been neglecting, treating poorly, or taking for granted…Either we’ve stopped paying...