Using Psychometric Tests During The Hiring Process Sep01

Using Psychometric Tests During The Hiring Process

How would you describe your hiring process? Intuitive? Personal? Subjective? What about technical or scientific?  The next time you hire, you may want to consider getting to know your candidate from a new perspective by inviting them to take a personality or aptitude test. More and more, the recruitment industry and HR departments are looking to data to help legitimize the hiring process through talent measurement tools called ‘psychometrics.’   WHAT Some of these tests have gained notoriety over the years, such as personality test Myers-Briggs which ranks individuals on four distinct areas (but is actually not recommended for hiring purposes). Others, such as the Birkman (a must-do for internal employees at Smart Savvy) assesses both personality and behaviour, and gives a comprehensive overview of how you work and where your career strengths are. There’s also the Kolbe, DISC, EQ-i, and StrengthsFinder (which we’re hosting a LeaderLounge session on in September, if you’ve ever wondered how to put your strengths into play in the workforce.)    WHEN Hiring managers and recruitment firms use psychometric tests varyingly. You may encounter them: After an initial resume screening (this method helps recruiters and HR managers weed through piles of resumes before moving forward to in-person interviews) As part of the interview process (either used in the decision-making process or used not for selection but rather simply to facilitate discussion) In the final stages of candidate deliberation (to truly assess one candidate against another and seek further evidence of personality traits or strengths that were not satisfied in conversation).   WHY Some believe that psychometrics can be used to add to the candidate experience and ensure that how they’re treated during the hiring process is nothing but fair. Rather than making gut instinct decisions, decisions become founded on test results and concrete information afforded by the candidate themselves. These tests also save the...

What does a psychometric test look like? Apr24

What does a psychometric test look like?

(In case you missed Part 1: Want the job? You’ll have to pass this test). If the words “psychometric testing” have you thinking of inkblots and word associations, think again. Psychometric tests measuring personality and aptitude are highly sophisticated examinations – sometimes on paper, sometimes on computer – and all they really require are honest, instinctual answers and a bit of your time. As part of the interview process, you might be asked to complete a psychometric test: After an initial resume screening (this method helps recruiters weed through piles of resumes before moving forward to in-person interviews) As part of the interview process (on-site or at the office of a company who administers the tests on their behalf) In the final stages of candidate deliberation (to truly assess one candidate against another and seek further evidence of personality traits or strengths that were not satisfied in conversation). Here, we have the ultimate guide on the seven most common psychometric tests you might encounter and what they’re trying to find out about you: Meyer Briggs Personality Indicator (MBTI)/Jung Typology Test – This test is all about mapping out your at-work comfort zone. Based around four personality dichotomies: Extraversion/Introversion, Sensing/Intuition, Thinking/Feeling, and Judging/Perceiving, the MBTI reveals not only what you’ll be competent doing but also what tasks you’ll actually like. Birkman Method – What are your interests and how do they motivate you at work? That’s what this assessment wants to know. Looking at your self-assessed “usual” behaviors, your needs (i.e. lots of feedback vs. total independence) and the way you act under stress, the Birkman is used to determine your management style and the likely areas where your performance will shine. DISC – Have you ever been asked about your capacity for stress? This test claims to be...

Want the Job? First you’ll have to pass this test. Apr19

Want the Job? First you’ll have to pass this test.

How would you describe the hiring process? Intuitive? Personal? Subjective? What about technical or scientific? The next time you switch roles or companies, you might be surprised. You might be asked to take a personality or aptitude test. More and more, the recruitment industry is looking to ‘big data’ to help legitimize the hiring process – and to get it right – through talent measurement tools called ‘psychometrics’.  And critics are pushing back: can science really claim to hold a crystal ball on how you’ll actually do the job? If you’re not familiar with the term ‘psychometrics’ (literally, mind-mapping), try these on: Meyer Briggs, Birkman Method, Disc, EQi, StrengthsFinder, Kolbe, Keirsey Temperament Sorter. Sounding familiar? A reportedly $2-to-4billion dollar industry says if you haven’t heard of psychometrics, you soon will. Here’s the crash course: psychometrics are tests used by recruiters to help filter through mountains of resumes and identify ‘best fit’ individuals throughout the hiring process. There are two main types of psychometrics: 1)   Personality tests: these measure your own way of doing things, like the way you interact with your surroundings and deal with people. 2)   Aptitude tests: these measure more specific areas of ability: problem solving, communication skills, calculations. In practice, psychometric tests are designed to help HR professionals measure the kind of skills you won’t find on a resume – like leadership or your ability to handle stress – against their insider-knowledge of what’s deemed “ideal” for the team, the company and the job. Such tests (and the use of them to screen applicants) are also highly controversial. For one there is the question of accuracy: can someone’s personality truly be measured and predicted? And then there is a question of honesty: is it possible to cheat? Could an applicant ‘game’ their results by picking best-perceived answers? A recent...