The Number One Hiring Mistake That You’re Probably Making Jun08

The Number One Hiring Mistake That You’re Probably Making

First impressions are powerful ~ will the first date pave way for a second? Will the business card exchange lead to a sale? Can the eager interviewee transform sweaty palms and dry mouth into career magic? In fact, first impressions are so paramount you’re probably weighing if this article is worth reading solely based on my first sentences. (How am I doing so far?) Along with getting second dates and sales leads, first impressions are also, unfortunately, the common denominator of many bad hiring decisions. According to Monster, many recruiters derive go/no -go conclusions within the first six minutes of an interview, and many say the first 90 seconds are imperative for making a good first impression. Even more alarming, one study in 2000 revealed that judgments made in the first 10 seconds of an interview could predict the outcome of the interview. From a hiring perspective, these quick, uncognitive, and emotional decisions are a disaster and contribute to about 50% of hiring mistakes. In fact, from any perspective these quick decisions can lead to disaster. Imagine applying this philosophy to anything else in your life: would 10 seconds be enough to buy a car, choose a spouse, or decide you even want the new job you’re interviewing for? Would 6 minutes even be enough? (We’re hoping you’re saying no at this point.) We think we can tell a lot about a person quickly — we have this bias that makes us think we can tell a person’s Myers-Briggs, Birkman, and Kolbe scores just by the way they smile or shake a hand. But we can’t; vital decisions, like hiring, retention, and the makeup of a team, should not be made within the blink (or a few blinks) of an eye. Hiring requires contemplation, deep thought, and most of all, money. Hiring on an impulse is costly not only financially, but to your team, and, let’s...

Who You Gonna Call? Dec10

Who You Gonna Call?

The time has come. Marina Guy, our Creative Services & Communications Recruitment Consultant, is gearing up for her final day in the office before her imminent (and inaugural) transition to parenthood. Marina has built a thriving practice in both disciplines and will be returning to us in early 2017. If you want to wish Marina well send her a message on LinkedIn. Keep Calm and Call Catherine Ducharme. Team Smart Savvy is (uber) pleased to announce that Catherine Ducharme will be stepping in on a contract basis to manage the Communications-focused roles within Marina’s portfolio while she is away. For those of you who know Catherine, our guess is you’ve just said to yourself, “Now that makes sense!” For those of you who’ve not met Catherine, you’ll definitely want to get to know her ASAP. Catherine is a career communicator with 25+ years of corporate and internal brand + communications leadership experience within the technology, life sciences, health, and professional services sectors. If you are a top-shelf communications professional, we suggest reaching out to Catherine on LinkedIn to get acquainted (or you can email her at ‘Catherine at smartsavvy dot com’). Watch for future announcements on the Creative Services...

Smoke Out the ‘Pretenders’ May27

Smoke Out the ‘Pretenders’

How to Hire Proven, #StandApart Marketers   At Smart Savvy, we’ve interviewed a lot of people over our 8 years (4500+). We maintain: no one has the potential to pull the wool over your eyes like a marketer.  When we evaluate candidates, we adhere to the 20-60-20 rule.  In the workplace there is generally a top 20%, a middle 60% and, unfortunately, a bottom 20%.  With each interview, we are always looking to identify individuals who fall squarely within the top 20% of their field.  Those who truly #StandApart. When meeting with candidates, look beyond first impressions (the leading cause of hiring blunders) by performing a ‘deep dive’ through their career (scuba vs. snorkel).  For the bulk of our interviewing, we focus squarely on contribution and results.  Look for evidence of growth and professional proof to support claims of greatness.  When you spot a pattern of concrete, quantifiable accomplishments, you will know that you are zeroing in on a #StandApart candidate. Midway through our interviews, we reach a section that we often refer to as “The Humbling”.  At this stage we ask two questions: What have you done that has had the most dramatic impact on your employer’s bottom line — Specifically, what have you done that has increased revenue, streamlined efficiencies or decreased expenses for your employer(s)? What have you done (throughout your career) that would cause you to #StandApart from other candidates who will be applying for similar roles? Inevitably interviewees slip into describing the character traits that differentiate them from the pack.  Although we are keen to learn who people are, at this stage of the interview we must remain focused on what they have done.  You’d be surprised at how many ‘marketers’ have a difficult time articulating (much less quantifying)...

Love Monday #56: Digital Marketing

What makes for a good digital marketer? Creativity, knowledge and your ability to find one! This #LoveMonday edition features: two digital marketing leader profiles, a quick fix for your entire recruitment process and a reminder of the true traits defining motivation (hint: it’s not money or praise). Wishing you some fun in the sun (now that the cupcakes are long gone)! Happy #LoveMonday. Only top leaders demonstrate the ‘real deal’ when it comes to motivation. Here’s how to differentiate between those seeking external rewards and the leader who will perform no matter what @DanielGolemanEI … An interview with the Digital Marketing Manager for Tourism Richmond on what’s driving the industry and how to succeed via @SmarttCanada @notbranded … What should you negotiate for when a raise is off the table? … I’m Ronald McDonald and I love Taco Bell’s new breakfast. An interview with the digital marketing strategist behind the “waffle taco” and a whole lot of social success. … 3 easy, action-oriented steps to shape up your whole recruiting...

Get on Board: Cultural Fit Matters Jan22

Get on Board: Cultural Fit Matters

What if I told you, as a job candidate, that besides a skills and experience checklist, you’re also being measured by a cultural fit cheat sheet? And sometimes it will take three or four interviews for a company to figure it all out? CEO, Kristine Steuart reveals some of those behind-the-scenes team-building details in her latest post for the Allocadia Leading in Change Series. In it, Steuart describes the process her and her partners stick to when bringing new people on board (a timely topic, considering their recent appointment of SAP-vet, James Thomas, to the role of Chief Marketing Officer). When I read the post, I couldn’t wait to point out a few of the big candidate a-ha’s I saw in her post. I’ve seen one too many marketers nearly at their wit’s end in the midst of a complex recruiting process. The problem? They think the drawn out hiring process is all about them (and their perceived shortcomings), when in fact, it’s all about the company. The long and the short of it is this: if you are applying for jobs in a vacuum of skills & qualifications -i.e. if you are forgetting about the goals, culture and people of an organization – than you are doing nothing to prove your fit. Here’s what you can learn from Allocadia’s hiring process – and how it translates to your own “cultural fit cheat sheet” for getting the job:   1. Don’t be shy about working within your network (they are working within theirs) How can you compete with the friend of a trusted friend who’s got the skills and already passed the pre-screen test of someone they wouldn’t mind eating lunch with? You can’t. The job goes to them. When candidates ask me if it would be too pushy/presumptuous to let...

Love Monday #43: Leadership Accountability

You don’t need to be in a position of power to start exhibiting leadership. In fact, a simple change of thinking can do the trick. Instead of saying you work “for” Company X, try saying you work “with” them. That simple mind-shift can help you recognize and appreciate your autonomy (more than your servitude) and it lays the groundwork for a career partnership with your employer and colleagues. Of course, it’s important to note that your interests, as an employee, are part of that relationship too. And the best companies will work hard to demonstrate they are working ‘with’ you too (a common trait of BC’s Dream Employers). What’s your thinking around leadership? Are you a leader? Does a direct report make you one? Our friends at Knightsbridge are asking an important question: Are You Ready To Make 2014 The Year Of Leadership Accountability? Managing Director @VinceMolinaro says true leaders hold themselves accountable for the bottom-line by asking: “What challenges and opportunities will my company face this year, and in what specific ways will I need to step up as a leader?” Read more. … If you thought Emotional Intelligence was a have or have-not proposition, think again. In his latest LinkedIn blog, Daniel Goleman explains the various types of Emotional Intelligence, our varying capacities for each, and the underlying empathic muscle that makes-or-breaks a great leader. … Why would a CEO become someone else’s underling? Fast Company’s @JeffChu has been receiving major kudos for his fascinating insights around Angela Ahrendts’ “new season” at @Apple and what it will take to spark the “retail revolution” she’s after. #EmotionalIntelligence #WholeMind #Leadership #GreatRead #ClickNow. … STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) careers offer a huge opportunity to women. Locally, we have groups Girl Development championing the cause. This article (w/ infographic) looks at the dismal entry of women into STEM careers (less than 25%) and asks whether strong, vocal and prominent female...

Pulling the Reins on Interview Rambling Jan08

Pulling the Reins on Interview Rambling

Of all the deadly job interview sins, rambling is one of the worst. An HR Manager recently confided to me this about a candidate: He looked great on paper, but in-person he wouldn’t stop talking. I felt like I needed reins. As Matt Youngquist writes in his article on Interview Rambling, “Many candidates talk until they run out of steam or eventually just trail off to the point at which the interviewer decides to interrupt them. This is not ideal, as you might imagine.” Chalk it up to nerves? I’m not so sure. Feeling on-the-spot is one thing, but I’d credit most interview rambling to a simple lack of candidate preparation. As the interviewer, I want to see a candidates’ top performance, not their first rehearsal. After a first meeting, I tend to remember not just what a candidate said but how they made me feel. Was I intrigued? Was I annoyed? Did I feel my time and my questions were valued? Was I comfortable? Unfocused, long-winded talking can kill the sense that a two-way conversation is happening. It can also make a candidates seem unorganized, unsure of his/her self and unable to cope with pressure. And, frankly, it can be boring. I want to Here’s how to pull back on interview rambling and make every word count:   How to Reel in Interview Rambling in 3 Easy Steps 1. Start in a Good Place Glassdoor.com recommends you take some time pre-interview to get happy and confident about who you are as a candidate – especially as it correlates to the job in question. Ask yourself: Why are you a great fit for the job? Do you have exemplary and compelling stories to relate about your career? Are you excited about you? Luckily, interview questions themselves are highly predictable –...

Love Monday #42 – Local Issues Jan06

Love Monday #42 – Local Issues

For many, this Monday in January is a second New Year’s. The real, back-to-the-grind after the holidays. A second re-do on already bent resolutions. So, while Jan 1 may have had us waxing esoteric and thinking big picture, we like to use week 2 to start tackling local issues (i.e. those in our immediate control). As you’ll read below, trust and being a great audience to those around us are high on our list. We’re also reshaping priorities (i.e. lunch with new co-worker instead of social media crawl) and shaving bad habits (the busyness crutch) in small, focused and impactful ways. What are your local issues? What can you change today? From the mosh pit to the office: Read William Azaroff‘s epiphany about Vancouver’s local music scene and how important it is to be a great crowd. Do you inspire your boss/your coworkers/your mentors to play their best? … Author Nan Russell argues that “trust” plays a bigger role in careers and career potential than most realize. Her new book, “Trust Inc”. looks at the various ways we build, lose and gain trust – and explains why trust is a local issue (in other words, in your hands to change). … Here’s a tip to make your next employee evaluation or resume-writing session a breeze. Forbes suggests starting an email folder to capture all your accomplishments.That way, they’re available for easy recall when you need them (and you will). What to include? Kudos from clients or coworkers, any hard, numerical results from campaigns or projects and pieces for your portfolio. Click here for 9 more things you should do at work at the start of 2014. … Do you love telling people about the millions of meetings you have to wrap up? The thousands of phone calls you need to return? Or the...

Do You Know What’s Important? Dec25

Do You Know What’s Important?

“How did you go bankrupt? Gradually, then suddenly.” – Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises Raising kids is the leading case study in gradually-suddenly theory. It goes like this: each meal, each bedtime, each walk to the mailbox is steeped in slowness, but they’re all bullet trains to adulthood. I learned this old-adage the hard way when I saw my first daughter get married this summer. One moment, she was still a kid and then…she was fully grown. I was ecstatic for her. I was floored. I was gradually letting go and then suddenly a father-in-law. Likewise, careers are funny children. They grow up slowly and then quickly. The have growth spurts and angry periods and times of great joy and unsettling complexity. You forget to watch them for a month or two, head buried in life’s other work, and they’re suddenly in a very different place. On the brink of major milestones. On the edge of major drops. A Director of Marketing in his mid-thirties recently came to me looking for a new challenge. I asked him what kind of role he was targeting, what direction he wanted to take. He confided to me, “Director of Marketing was the plan.” For him, the question of What’s next? was a heavy one. An overwhelming one. And the next logical stop, CMO or other high-level position, left him with a “meh” feeling. He’d been so squarely focused on the sudden that, by the time he got there, he felt little sense of having earned or accomplished the feat. The needle had moved, but to where? An Australian mom-blogger hit the nail on the head for me: “We each face sudden declines. Moments where we realise what we’ve been neglecting, treating poorly, or taking for granted…Either we’ve stopped paying...

Love Monday #40 – Do You Fit? Dec09

Love Monday #40 – Do You Fit?

What does a high-end, world class retailer like De Beers look for when opening its first flagship store in Canada? Fit. Sure, we’re not the biggest city (competency) but as Vancouver grows its luxe reputation and international fluency, we’re starting to look the most attractive (fit). As for Vancouver’s professional class, you’ll want to start thinking about your own global appeal as well. Competing in the midst of a so-called satellite Big Apple will no doubt have an effect on the sheen and shape of shoes you’ll fill in the corporate future. That said, home grown has carved out its own niche market in YVR too. So the #LoveMonday question of the day is: Where do you fit? Would you ever reject someone (or have you been rejected) from an organization based on fit rather than competency? Top CEOs, like Apple’s Tim Cooke, are aligning talent strategy with corporate strategy to stack their leadership bench. And they’re looking to their HR counterparts for the human data and analytics to drive it. … Help! I’m on a toxic work team! If that’s you, here’s some advice on nursing your team back to health, including, step one: admit you’re part of the problem. … Here’s what the data read-out on Canada tells us: 50 insane things to love about being Canadian. … I was going to block Upworthy from my news feed forever, but what happened next changed everything (A look at how Facebook’s algorithm tinkering and an ensuing social media battle are changing the way you read...